Design of August 2013   The Hamptons Design Picture of Traditional Hamptons Gables and two storey design traditional design narrow site design level site design house of the month floor plans all 5 bedroom

Design of August 2013 – The Hamptons Design

Here is a home inspired by American Architecture – “Ocean Street House” referred to in our office as ‘The Hamptons Design’ – a worthy ‘Design of the Month”. Working from a collage of images provided by our clients, the aim was to have an American Styled Home that fitted into the typical Australian suburban street-scape, looking unique but not out of place. Taking into account strict council requirements in respect of building heights, setbacks, site coverage, car accommodation and so on.. and having only a narrow site to work with, this project was always going to be difficult – so it is a good thing Storybook likes a challenge. The result is a beautiful 5 bedroom home that takes full advantage of the site with an emphasis on outdoor living. Downstairs ‘The Hamptons Design’ features a double tandem Garage (due to width constraints), Separate Entry, Study, Library, Dining, Living, Kitchen with large Walk In Pantry, Covered Alfresco & Verandahs. Upstairs  ‘The Hamptons Design’ has 4 Bedrooms for the kids with a glamorous family Bathroom, a zoned Master Bedroom with large Walk In Robe and Ensuite and the Balcony off the Master Bedroom is the icing on the cake. Adapting an American Hamptons feel in Australia on a typical suburban site is difficult with council’s often restrictive height requirements and three dimensional building envelopes. While many of the traditional American Manor Houses feature close side setbacks, high pitched roofs, gables, a raised ground floor and are often 3 storey’s in height (especially the hamptons design look), Australia’s more conservative council codes make it much harder to achieve a similar feel. Therefore it is always advisable to use design professionals who understand this architecture & knows how to work within these restrictions to avoid being disappointed with the result. Much of the process of designing a home these days is in understanding the constraints of a site and educating the client along the way so everyone is working towards the same realistic goal.